Chris Borchert Photography
17Jun/12Off

EAST SOOKE REGIONAL PARK

18Oct/11Off

TIME FOR A LITTLE INTROSPECTION

I'm not one to write gratuitous amounts of text, but I'm at a bit of a crossroads with respect to how I want to manage my photography endeavours, and I'm going to rant for a little bit here.

I've been fantasizing about doing something more serious with my photography for quite some time.  However, I've had a few reservations about commitment, loss of freedoms and time management, that have left me hesitant about making that first step.  I do not intend for photography and multi-media design to become a larger part of my life (it already consumes a fair portion), it is rather a reorganization and new prioritization of things that I'm actually interested in and excited about.  I had an unusual personal interview with fellow UBC REC staff member, Jill Slatery, last week, and this combined with a few recent photography projects has really got me thinking about where it is that I'd like to be.

As I'm now running into the characteristic lull in my will to write these things down, and because I would otherwise be late for class, I'll have to put my brief rant on hiatus.  The rest of it may or may not end up here, but one thing is certain: new things are coming.  For now, here is a random selection of images from my catalogue that I've simply never gotten around to posting on the blog.  I have an inordinate number of neglected edits like these just sitting there gathering dust on my hard drives, and hopefully I will get around to posting more of them in the future.  I am still uncertain about my decision to make a couple of these shots available for public viewing, but content aside I am proud of my work, so here they are for now:

14Sep/11Off

WILDFIRE FIGHTING — INFERNO AT A GOLD MINE

These panoramas were shot at the Musselwhite Mine Fire in Nothern Ontario.

14Sep/11Off

FIRST LOOK — TISIGAR LAKE FIRE (BC/YUKON)

Fighting wildfires this summer for the BC Government was an incredible experience.  I brought my Pelican-encased Canon 5D in the Forest Service trucks wherever we went, but the majority of my fireline shots were captured with a point-and-shoot camera that I had fastened to my belt.  I recently managed to crunch a few panorama shots that I've had stored away for a few months just waiting for the necessary hardware to arrive.  I plan to post more of my fireline photography sporadically over the next few months.